Rad Sechrist: What is drawing?

I'm constantly adapting and learning, but this is how I think about drawing right now. This information goes all the way into rendering with light and shadow. All the shadow shapes must be designed well and reinforce the direction with overlap.











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27 comments:

Steve Allen said...

Awesome. Reminiscent of a bunch of Walt Stanchfield lectures!

Thanks for this!

JP said...

Great post. I loved your drawing illustrating Rhythms. Beautiful. The line/bullet metaphor kinda got lost on me though... Rhythm can be a process of interrupting flow- a hand slapping a table for example? Thanks again.

Mallo said...

Simply...awesome! Thanks.

XAV said...

A very mix of all your great ideas Rad, this is a very important tutorial for everyone who draw.

Florian Satzinger said...

Wow, thanks!

TJ Lubrano said...

Brilliant post! I can certainly use this ^_^!! Grazie Mille!

Uaaah said...

Great lecture! I really learned a lot from it!! Thanks.

Fábio said...

Brilliant as usual! Thanks a lot for this.

Could you please include, if not the entire post, a little more in the RSS feed? When we share feeds via Google Buzz/Reader a little more content helps enticing others to check it out.

thanks

Fabio

chromasketch said...

awesome tutorial rad.

Sami said...

I am sooooo thankful to you for sharing this. Lot to learn from all of your tutorials.

Cheers!

Rodrigo said...

Man, you are a natural born teacher. Everything seems so easy when you explain it...
Thank you very much for these great posts.

Rodrigo

whoreray/redfive said...

My god, this is the clearest and best description of flow & design I've ever heard.

Pulpo Designer said...

This is maybe the best drawing lesson that I had receive in my entire life. Many, many thanks.

Randall Sly said...

What a post :) Thanks

Lee-Roy said...

Well done, Rad! Very clear. Neat ideas with the stones and beautiful examples, as well. Of course, there actually are drawings all throughout the process, but I appreciate your way of holding yourself to a standard so that, in your mind, it isn't a drawing until it has all of these components.

rad sechrist said...

Lee-roy: Maybe a better way of putting it, is you have a "bad" drawing. In that you haven't designed it well or communicated a "clear" idea. Of course, drawings can always be better, but I usually run though this check list and make sure I didn't make any of these types of mistakes.

rad sechrist said...

Lee-Roy: also, I like to think of construction as something floating right under the surface of a drawing. You lay the "drawing" on top of the construction and then throw the construction away. Sometimes I notice people trying to "construct" the drawing and I was trying to separate the two ideas.

Sherm said...

A wonderful and insightful new look at rhythm and flow...very eye-opening, and helps me see things in a new light. Amazing work...thanks for sharing!

Shanna said...

Even the approach at which you present information is done in such an aesthetic fashion, so awesome. :)

Kasidej Hem said...

This post is like a conclusion of your recent how to blog. I learned so much from your tips. Thanks a million.

Mariya K said...

Wow thank you! Lots to ponder :)

Octavio E. Rodriguez said...

Great info! The journey continues for us all.

The Ivanator said...

YES, yes, yes!! Bookmarked it and save it in my pocket. Do you think it's necessary to have construction before you lay the drawing on top of it? And why do you need to throw away the construction?

Sam Nielson said...

Awesome post, thank you for taking the time to put it all together.

Wild Wing said...

Very good post!
But, sorry... "The guy with gun" analogy isn´t clear to me, what makes me a bit of a dummy.

If I had a gun, I would figure out why I can only hit a bent wall right now. However, it seems everybody else here got the idea. So, please, anyone, feel free to explain that to me.

Thanks.

chromasketch said...

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.. I believe the bullet analogy refers to how if you hit a wall that is on a angle or that is in the shape of a flowing line, the bullet would graze off of it and continue going. As opposed to a flat wall which would stop the bullet dead. The note shows that the only time you'd hit the wall flat is if the line ("wall") curved back towards itself.

Mike Bear said...

Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge. I really liked your visuals and analogy of the boat on the river. You are awesome.