Rad Sechrist: Emotional shapes

I didn't make this up, it's something that has been done in production design both in live action and animation for a long time. It's a lot of fun to play with. Here is how I used it in a recent comic.








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12 comments:

Vanmotion said...

I wasn't aware about shapes on comics and animation, I'm going to pay atention about it more often.
This principles are also present in advanced composition. Very useful :). Thanks

Noor Mohammed said...

Great stuff. I love the way of connecting shapes to emotion even in small details. I have two stupid questions=) If we need to show the buddy character with spiky hair in happy mood, what will we do? He still have the sharp spikes on his head. And if we need to bring danger in the smooth interior ( which we have established already) with out any exernal charactes or objects what can we do?

Vikram said...

Great thoughts.......Thanks for sharing

coNstanza Oroza said...

Awesome, thanks for sharing!

(iwantthatcomic!)

rad sechrist said...

Noor Mohammed: In this case, it doesn't matter if the character is happy, the spikes add some element of danger to the scene all on their own. If you look at a lot of animated films you will notice triangles showing up in the backgrounds, so if you don't add new characters, you can just add them to the background. You can have triangular shadows fall, or have something break, or whatever you can think of.

Noor Mohammed said...

Yup,In the case of Back ground, I am totally convinced. After all it depends up on the artist's visualization ability. How can he incorporate the shapes. But I am a little bit nervous about character. If we need to show a spiky dragon crying, we cannot avoid the 'DRAGONISH' danger from the scene totally right? Again I am sorry for my stupidity =P

rad sechrist said...

Noor: Actually it helps you. Any time you have contrast, it's good. If you have something that looks like it shouldn't feel sad, and it is sad, it means it took a lot more to make it sad. For instance, if you saw a big tough guy crying, you would think someone must have died, or something big happened. If you saw a cute little kid crying, you would think he just scraped his knee. You actually want the contrast.

Noor Mohammed said...

Wow, That makes sense. Great. Thanks for your patience Red. I really Appreciate that=)

Demetre said...

My brain is about to pop after reading your article because in Louie de Carmen's article he talks about rhythm and contrast. Like adding circle and square shapes to create contrast. How would you implement both ideas? Or do you? Maybe I'm thinking to hard on this one

thanks

rad sechrist said...

Demetre: It's all relative. If a scene just has more triangles or more circles than the last, than it changes the mood.

Tom Scholes said...

yummmmmmmmm

nlombardo said...

love your drawings man! that establishing shot of the witches place is just awesome. I'll have to pick your brain more next time I see you figure drawing @ CDA!